Important People during Dvorak’s Time in America
Name of Person
How did Dvorak meet this person?
What did this person do professionally?
What kind of relationship did Dvorak have with this person?
Impact this person had on Dvorak and/or his music:
Harry Burleigh
Harry was Dvorak’s assistant and a student at the National Conservatory.
Harry became one of the first African American classical concert singers in the country. He was also a composer and arranger of spirituals, in particular.
Harry and Dvorak had a close musical and professional relationship.
Harry was Dvorak’s assistant as well as colleague later on.
Harry shared his knowledge of Negro Spirituals with Dvorak, which influenced his New World Symphony.
Jeannette Thurber
Mrs. Thurber invited Dvorak to come to America. She paid for his trip.
Mrs. Thurber was a wealthy benefactor of the arts & started the National Conservatory of Music in NYC.
Mrs. Thurber was very supportive of Dvorak and helped him financially to come to America.
Mrs. Thurber was the reason Dvorak came to the US. Without her support, he would not have written a “New World” symphony or the “American String Quartet.”
Josef Kovarik
They met in Dvorak’s homeland of Bohemia and Josef came to the US with Dvorak.
Josef was Dvorak’s personal assistant and he was assigned to assist with his English. He was also a musician and music director.
They had a very close relationship, as Dvorak relied on him for English and other organizing tasks.
Dvorak benefited from Kovarik’s assistance with English in this country.
Anton Seidl
Dvorak was introduced to Dr. Seidl by James Gibbons Huneker.
Dr. Seidl was a musician and a conductor for the New York Philharmonic.
They had a close relationship, speaking or meeting every day.
Shared musical ideas in daily meetings and conversations. Dvorak learned much from these musical exchanges.
James Creelman
Introduced to Dvorak by Mrs. Thurber.
Press secretary for Mrs. Thurber and a correspondent for the NY Herald. Editor of the Evening Telegram.
Creelman was hired by Mrs. Thurber to make sure that Dvorak was mentioned regularly in the papers.
Dvorak was influenced by Creelman’s reviews of his musical works.
Henry Krehbiel
Introduced to Dvorak by Mrs. Thurber.
Writer for the New York Tribune newspaper. First scholarly critic to survey a number of different folk music traditions.
Krehbiel was a prominent journalist at the time Dvorak was in the U.S.
Krehbiel was a supporter of Dvorak’s compositions and his idea that the true American music came from its folk music traditions.
Edmund Stanton
Introduced to Dvorak by Mrs. Thurber.
Worked at the National Conservatory of Music in New York City.
Colleague of Dvorak’s at the Conservatory.
Dvorak was able to discuss musical compositions and ideas with his colleagues.
James Gibbons Huneker
Introduced to Dvorak by Mrs. Thurber.
Piano teacher and music critic at the National Conservatory.
Colleague of Dvorak’s at the Conservatory.
Dvorak was able to discuss musical compositions and ideas with his colleagues.

Click the file below to see the chart of important people in the book: